Top 15 des bonnes nouvelles de 2020 illustrées, pour se remonter le moral


Allez les gars on perd pas le moral parce que même si l’année 2020 est vraiment pourrie jusqu’au bout il y a quelques bonnes nouvelles qui tentent modestement


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The Scottish Parliament passed a bill that will make pads and tampons free across the board, making Scotland the first country on the globe to end "period poverty". This is a huge victory for the civic groups that supported the bill, considering that nearly 10 percent of girls in Britain have been unable to afford period products, and 19 percent have resorted to using substitutes. The provision of free products is also aimed at combating the culture of silence and stigma surrounding menstruation, which can pose physical, sexual and mental health risks for young women. . @weeklygraphicnews @fastcompany @nytimes #illustration #editorialillustration #editorialart #scotland #period #women #feminine #flying #sanitary #goodnews #goodnewsfeed #bill #artwork #graphic #vectorart #character #girly #girlpower #healthylifestyle #healthyliving #instaartist #instagood

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A lab study conducted at Brandon University in Manitoba, Canada found that a group of 60 waxworms was able to devour more than 30 square centimeters of a plastic bag in less then a week. . It shows that waxworms, which normally live in beehives and eat wax, also feast on polyethylene. They owe this ability to their intestinal microbes, and excrete glycol – a form of alcohol, after a meal of plastics. . While this doesn't mean that a bunch of caterpillars will end the plastic pollution, researchers are more interested in a species of intestinal bacteria in the worms that is able to survive on plastic for more than a year as its only source of nutrients. Thus, they called the worms 'plastivores'. . @weeklygraphicnews @forbes #illustration #editorial #waxworms #plasticfree #glycerol #feast #dinner #conceptual #funny #sciencenews #editorialart #editorialillustration #artistsoninstagram #digitalpainting #wacom #realism #goodnews #newsfeed #studygram #scientificillustration #sciencememes #artwork #magazine #cover #instaart

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🏃Seattle residents will have more space to exercise and bike on as the city will permanently close 20 miles of streets to most vehicular traffic. The Stay Healthy Streets initiative started in April to temporarily provide space for residents to get out of the house and exercise while maintaining social distancing during the pandemic. 👟🛹🚲 People are now encouraged to skate, walk, jog, bike and roll down the closed streets. ___ @weeklygraphicnews @cnn #illustration #feet #legs #seattle #jogging #skateboard #bikelife #quarantine #artwork #vectorillustration #lineart #running #editorialart #editorial #editorialillustration #goodnews #seattlelife #streetworkout #healthyliving #nocars #illustrationoftheday #illustrator #graphicnews #positivity #sneakerart #conceptual

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Better late than never. Pangolins – the world's most trafficked endangered species – can now breathe a sigh of relief as they will no longer be included in Chinese Pharmacopoeia, the official compendium of traditional medical products that are widely used within China. __ The decision comes after the small mammal was identified as a potential intermediary for covid-19 between bats and humans. __ As many as 200,000 pangolins are consumed each year in Asia for their scales and meat. Chinese authorities had already outlawed the poaching of pangolins in 2007 and banned the commercial import of pangolin-related products in 2018, but the moves did little to stem the trade, thanks in part to loopholes in the ban and lenient treatment of those involved. __ The heightened protections were greeted with praise by several environmental groups, calling them "a significant milestone" in protecting the endangered species. __ @weeklygraphicnews @guardian #illustration #pangolin #scales #spiral #protection #animallovers #wildanimal #pangolins #china #goodnews #editorial #goodnewsfeed #editorialart #artwork #editorialillustration #digitalpainting #digitalart #wacom #safe #illustrationart #illustrationoftheday #covidgoodnews #asianews

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"I couldn't think of protecting myself, because the babies were under my protection. I was okay, so I needed to help." Pamela Zeinoun, a nurse at Saint George Hospital in Beirut, was in charge of five babies suffering from various health issues who needed to be kept in incubators when the port explosion hit, decimating the building. She passed out on the floor. “When I woke up, I did not know where I was. I tried to go back through the door, but the door was closed shut.” Zeinoun managed to get inside with the help of a father and another nurse and were able to find the babies. Two were saved by the father and the nurse, and Pamela scooped up the remaining three.  “We started running down the stairs. There was no electricity. Blood everywhere, people screaming.” In the frenzy, Zeinoun got separated from the others. Her heart raced because she knew she had to get the babies to another hospital quickly. Their survival depended on incubators.  She walked for 40 minutes in the dark with the three babies in her arms. When she reached the next hospital, she found injured staff in a damaged building with no incubators. So she started to walk again, as no cars could get by because of the debris. Surprisingly, the babies weren't crying and she fear they may not be alive anymore. "I checked their color – are they blue or are they pink? They weren't crying. They were just sleeping, you know?" In the end, after 5 kilometers walked through chaos and debris, Pamela found a car that took her to a functioning hospital just outside Beirut, were she fit all three babies in an incubator, to keep them warm and safe. When the parents got to St George Hospital, they realised the babies weren't there anymore. Then the staff told them "Do not worry, your children are with Pamela. This is her phone number, you can contact her and see your babies." And so they did. @weeklygraphicnews @arabnews #illustration #nurse #hero #beirut #baby #pamelazeinoun #heroic #lebanon #artwork #editorialillustration #editorialart #digitalpainting #portrait #kindness #realism #truestory #inspiring #instagood #goodnews

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Brazil's football governing body has announced that it's adopting an equal pay policy for both women's and men's football, becoming one of the first countries in the world to do so. "The CBF has equaled the prize money and allowances between men's and women's football, which means the women players will earn the same as the men," said Rogerio Caboclo, president of Brazil’s football association CBF. "There is no more gender difference, because CBF is treating men and women equally," he said. This means Marta, the record owner for the most goals scored in World Cups – in both men and women competitions – will earn the same as Neymar Jr, the current playmaker of the Cariocas. While the Brazilian men’s team is known for having won the World Cup a record five times, the lesser-known women's team is also one of the best in the game, with a World Cup final appearance in 2007. The team also reached the Olympic finals in 2004 and 2008. Brazil joined a small number of countries among Norway, New Zealand and Australia, to pay its men's and women's national teams the same, and just a day after the announcement, England took the same decision. ⚽ Source: @dwnews For more uplifting illustrated stories from around the world follow @weeklygraphicnews #illustration #football #brazil #martavieirasilva #neymarjr #brasil🇧🇷 #flag #equalrights #equalpay #gendergap #artwork #goodnews #editorial #soccer #digitalpainting #portraitart #playmaker #nationalteam #cbf #positivity #editorialart #uplifting #rio #womenpower #footballnews #footballart #editorialillustration

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“Hello Pia, I’ve read your story in the papers. You sound like a badass. I am an artist from the UK and I’ve made some work about the migrant crisis, obviously I can’t keep the money. Could you use it to buy a new boat or something? Please let me know. Well done. Banksy.” This was the email that Pia Klemp – the captain of several NGO boats that rescued thousands of people over recent years – got in September 2019. While initially she thought is a joke, it turned out Klemp was chosen by the British artist due to her political stance on the migrant crisis. “I don’t see sea rescue as a humanitarian action but as part of an anti-fascist fight." Soon Pia assembled a crew of European activists with long experience in search and rescue operations, and aquired a vessel which she named Louise Michel, after a French feminist anarchist. Painted in bright pink and featuring Banksy's artwork, the Louise Michel set sail in secrecy on 18 August under a German flag. The 31-metre motor yacht, formerly owned by French customs authorities, is smaller but considerably faster than other NGO rescue vessels. Louise Michel sails currently in the central Mediterranean where on Thursday it rescued 89 people in distress, including 14 women and four children. It is now looking for a safe seaport to disembark the passengers or to transfer them to a European coastguard vessel. With a top speed of 27 knots, the Louise Michel would be able to “hopefully outrun the so-called Libyan coastguard before they get to boats with refugees and migrants and pull them back to the detention camps in Libya”, said Klemp. The planning of the mission was carried out in secrecy between London, Berlin and Burriana, where the Louise Michel had docked to be equipped for sea rescues. Fearing that media attention could compromise their goals, Banksy’s team and the rescue activists agreed to release the news about the boat only after carrying out the first rescue. @guardian @weeklygraphicnews #illustration #banksy #goodnews #streetart #refugee #migrantcrisis #mediteranean #rescue #editorialart #artwork #lifebuoy #louisemichel #stencil #ilustragram #goodnewsfeed #graphic #humanitarian

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George Ahearn, who grew up in the farming town of Othello, Washington, co-founded a non-profit after learning that Covid-19 was costing local farmers so much business that they were willing to destroy their crops. 🌱 His non-profit has since moved nearly 8 million pounds of produce from farms in eastern Washington to the western part of the state for distribution to hundreds of food banks and meal programs. "I know these people that I grew up with on one hand, and on the other hand I know there is a need here," Ahearn, 45, told CNN. "I'm just going to connect the two dots." 🍠 He started by calling food banks that were interested in taking some of the produce that would otherwise go to waste. But when he called the farmers, they wanted to give him truck loads of potatoes and onions — way more than Ahearn's car could handle. 🧅 He also had another problem: Food banks needed the potatoes and onions to be cleaned and bagged before donation. 🚩 "What I didn't realize was the logistical nightmare, because I thought I could just show up with potatoes harvested straight from the ground and give them right to the food bank," said Ahearn, who also runs a nursing business. "I couldn't believe it." So Ahearn asked for help and he connected with his two co-founders, Nancy Balin and Zsofia Pasztor. While Balin helped organize convoys to drive across Washington to pick up the produce, Pasztor assembled volunteers to clean and bag the food. 🤝 A week after they started, they hauled more than 60 tons of produce across the state and handed it to food banks. 🚚🚚🚚 After two convoys and some 70 tons of donated food, Ahearn thought they had accomplished their mission. But his co-founders pointed out that the food was going fast, and their job was just getting started. "That's 140,000 pounds," Ahearn said. "Surely we have flooded the market, and we should be proud of ourselves, and that's it. Three days later and there was not a potato or onion here. I realized that we need to do this again, and we got to do this for months." 🌱 @weeklygraphicnews @cnn #illustration #goodnews #positivity #onion #potato #trucks #foodbank #initiative #artwork #editorialart #washingtonstate #farm

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Germany is planning to ban floodlights from dusk for much of the year as part of its bid to fight a dramatic decline in insect populations. 🕶️ The country's environment ministry has drawn up a number of new measures to protect insects, ranging from partially outlawing spotlights to increased protection of natural habitats. 🦋 "Insects play an important role in the ecosystem…but in Germany, their numbers and their diversity has severely declined in recent years," reads the draft law, for which the ministry hopes to get cabinet approval by October. 🦟 The changes put forward in the law include stricter controls on both lighting and the use of insecticides. 🦗 Light traps for insects are to be banned outdoors, while searchlights and sky spotlights would be outlawed from dusk to dawn for ten months of the year. 💡 The draft also demands that any new streetlights and other outdoor lights be installed in such a way as to minimise the effect on plants, insects and other animals. 🌱 The use of weed-killers and insecticides would also be banned in national parks and within five to ten metres of major bodies of water, while orchards and dry-stone walls are to be protected as natural habitats for insects. 🐝 @phys.org @weeklygraphicnews #illustration #fly #funny #laidback #artwork #editorialart #dimlight #ecology #ecofriendly #insects #sketch #editorialillustration #digitalpainting #deutsch #insectsofinstagram #goodnews #positivity #kunst #uplifting #graphicnews #artist #instagood #digitalart

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Tasmanian devils have been reintroduced into the wild in mainland Australia for the first time in 3,000 years. Conservation groups released 26 of the mammals into a large sanctuary in Barrington Tops, north of Sydney. It's thought that packs of dingoes helped eradicate them on the mainland. There are still some on the island state of Tasmania but their numbers have dwindled over the past two decades. The Tasmanian devil, classified as endangered, gets its name from its high-pitch squeal and is renowned for fighting over access to animal carcases, which it grinds with the bone-crushing force of its jaws. It's estimated that there are fewer than 25,000 devils in the wild in Tasmania. During the 1990s, there were as many as 150,000 but the animal population was hit by a deadly mouth cancer that drastically cut numbers. Things have changed over the last three decades, as devils stunned the scientists by adapting and even overcoming the cancer, a body response that is very rarely observed in nature. @weeklygraphicnews @bbcnews #illustration #tasmanian #devil #black #goodnews #artwork #editorial #animaldrawing #roar #symmetry #editorialart #animalnews #australianart #aussie #tasmania #ilustragram #positivity #uplifting #negativespace #digitalpainting #digitalart

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Romania is setting up an ‘animal police’ to protect animals that are mistreated or in distress. The new police department will have structures in all counties and operate with 488 employees and 88 veterinarians. According to the draft emergency ordinance put up for public debate by the Ministry of Interior, police officers will have the right to enter private property without a warrant if the information indicates that an animal is in danger, and they can confiscate the animal . The measure aims to strengthen animal protection in the East European country, where there has been an outcry in recent years against instances of cruelty to dogs, horses and other animals. Local authorities will be obliged to provide public shelters, either by building them or having contracts with zoos or animal non-governmental organizations, which will be granted temporary custody of mistreated animals, as long as they can show they have the conditions to shelter and take care of them. @weeklygraphicnews @universulnet #illustration #animalpolice #romania #horseriding #beaconlighting #dogstagram #artwork #editorial #runwild #animaldrawing #animalcare #animalnews #goodnews #animallovers #speedhorse #conceptualart #digitalpainting #editorialart #digitalart #editorialillustration #vet

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"I now have two machines and I want to make more." ___ Meet Stephen Wamukota, a nine-year-old boy from Kenya who invented a wooden hand-washing machine that uses foot pedals to avoid touching surfaces and curb the spread of coronavirus. One foot tips a bucket of water, and the other foot tips a liquid soap bottle. ___ Stephen came up with the idea after learning on TV about ways to prevent catching the virus. Not much later, his father found him taking action. ""I had bought some pieces of wood to make a window frame, but I when I came back home after work one day I found that Stephen had made the machine," Mr Wamukota told the BBC. "The concept was his and I helped tighten the machine. I'm very proud," he said. He posted his son's invention on Facebook and was surprised how quickly it was shared, he said. Stephen was among 68 Kenyans given the Presidential Order of Service, Uzalendo (Patriotic) Award on Monday. Stephen said that he wants to be an engineer when he grows up and the county governor has promised to give him a scholarship, Mr Wamukota said. ___ @weeklygraphicnews @bbcnews @bbcafrica #illustration #award #goodnews #invention #kidinventors #artwork #kenya #africa #stephenwamukota #goodnewsfeed #editorial #editorialart #poster #conceptual #editorialillustration #africanpattern #africatoday #washyourhands #kenyanmemes #africainspired #blm #creativityeveryday #illustrationoftheday #illustrationart #wacom #digitalart #digitalpainting

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Since landing on Mars in November 2018, NASA's InSight lander recorded 450 seismic events, including 20 quakes with a magnitude of three to four. This came as a surprise for the NASA team, who concluded that Mars is a seismically active planet. Unlike Earthquakes, Marsquakes occur deeper beneath the surface, so the magnitude shouldn't feel the same, but they seem to have a higher frequency due to the absence of tectonic plates and the long-term cooling of the planet. . @weeklygraphicnews @cnn #illustration #typography #lettering #mars #nasa #spacenews #quake #earthquake #marsquake #36daysoftype #3d #type #editorial #editorialart #editorialillustration #curiosity #science #lifeonmars #rockart #gravity #cracks #artwork #graphic #illustrationoftheday #instaart #illustratorsoninstagram #newsfeed

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Top 15 des bonnes nouvelles de 2020 illustrées, pour se remonter le moral

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